Image courtesy of The Miles Davis Estate & Sony Music / Design by Sweden10

Why did we choose Bitches Brew for the first “Issue?” When one of our brethrens at Revive was asked to sit on the panel at this year’s CMJ Music Marathon Week by the Miles Davis Estate to talk about the intersections between jazz and hip-hop and how it relates to Bitches Brew, we jumped out of our seats and said “yes, yes!” At last there was a camp, the Miles Davis Estate, that like ours, valued progressive jazz music beyond the confines of strict genre assignments. We respected what the estate was doing, connecting with young cats in different areas of popular culture, and outside of academic jazz circles, to revitalize the legacy of Miles Davis—and not just Miles Davis—but the eras of music that can be connected directly back to his influence. After all, Miles was the artist who had the audacity (backed with genius), to exclaim that he had “changed music 3 or 4 times.” On another frontier, they were also connecting a heavily lacking historical context with today’s music terrain, giving music consumers (readers of online and print publications, DJs, young musicians, music collectors, passive radio listeners) a look at the deep roots of American jazz music, where Miles Davis stands as one of the most powerful icons.

Bitches Brew signifies a rebellious time in music. It acts as a microcosm of the greater story of our country in 1969 (when the album was recorded).  The turbulent layering of percussions, Mati Klarwein’s dark and alluring album cover with the Afro-centric and numinous elements, one of the first jazz recordings to heavily utilize the electric guitar, the almost obsessively meticulous tape editing of Teo Marcero, has maintained in our collective music consciousness an almost immortalized image of Davis as the mad scientist who orchestrated a body of work that would change—not just jazz—but music forever.

If Bitches Brew gave the luminous “Go” sign to rockify jazz music, or to jazzify rock music, or to just move outside the parameters of jazz and rock altogether and just make music, then what we see with young cats like Maurice Brown, Casey Benjamin, Esperanza Spalding, is that they are effectively doing the same thing. They are changing music forever. With this new cohort of “jazz” musicians, what we get is not so much of an intersection of jazz and hip-hop, but we get an understanding that hip-hop is jazz, and jazz is (and was during the Bitches Brew era) just as easily, rock. They are simply authentic expressions spawned from the depths of these audacious musicians’ souls—audacious like Miles Davis was audacious—actualized through the products of improvisation. Freedom.

The Revivalist is an online gallery of stories, curated in the forms of photographs, intimate interviews, documentary-style videos, live recordings of improvisational performances, made accessible to all of you who are interested in a little more than just the newest trends in music. This is for those of you who are beat archeologists, digital sound librarians, as well as those who simply have a curiosity to understand a little more about the backbone of American music: the musicians, the innovators, and their history at large. Our history at large.

The Revivalist Crew,

Boyuan Gao

Meghan Stabile

Nora Ritchie

Exclusive Never Been Released Live Recording of “Directions” from Bitches Brew Live

To kick off this month’s issue and to commemorate the 40th Anniversary of Bitches Brew, it is with our absolute honor at The Revivalist to present publically to the world the never before released live recording of “Directions,” from Bitches Brew Live, the Joe Zawinul composition performed at the Isle of Wright in 1970.

Miles Davis (trumpet), Gary Bartz (alto sax, soprano sax), Chick Corea (electric piano), Keith Jarrett (organ) Dave Holland (bass), Jack DeJohnette (drums), Airto Moreira (percussion).

Produced by Teo Macero

From the forthcoming album, MILES DAVIS: Bitches Brew Live. Scheduled to be released in 2011 by Legacy Recordings/Columbia Records/Sony Music Entertainment, Inc. From the forthcoming album, MILES DAVIS: Bitches Brew Live.

Comments

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  • http://www.MilesBonny.com miles bonny

    so can i buy it or something>! :)

  • http://www.myspace.com/kennydust kenny dust

    Peace Revivalist crew

    I love the sound of this. I feel like it has the potential to fill a cultural gap in a real and meaningful way, it’s an important work. I just wanted to say you have my support and I’ll definitely be putting the word out. I really hope you can achieve this within the confines of commerciality and all of that. Much success and prosperity to you.

    kd

  • Ron S

    Nice post.

    Have to disagree with your statement that BB was one of the first jazz recordings to feature electric guitar, though.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz_guitar#Late_1930s-1960s

  • http://materace-dla-was.com.pl materace

    would it be possible to translate your website into spanish because i have difficulties of speaking to english, and as there are not many pictures on your website i would like to read more of what you are writting

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  • http://gong.bg Kymberly Bollman

    thank you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  • colin house

    help! if this is a online magazine how do i access it? regards, c.house.

  • http://claaa7.blogspot.com claaa7

    I would really like to read this, but i can’t find any link to download it? i would buy it in a store but it says it’s an online mag?