Grammy season is upon us! The complete list of this year’s nominees was released earlier this morning, and REVIVE is happy to see artists who push the boundaries of styles such as jazz, instrumental & electronic, and next wave soul/R&B represented on the list. Artists such as Robert Glasper, D’Angelo, and Hiatus Kaiyote – among many others – earned nominations for their work this year in crafting new sounds that force listeners to question the limits of labels. Most noticeably is Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp A Butterfly (produced by Terrace Martin), which earned the rapper 7 of his 11 total Grammy nominations – this highest of any artist this year. Strictly speaking, TPAB is a hip-hop album, but it was widely acclaimed for its incorporation of many different styles of music beyond hip-hop, including R&B, funk, soul, and jazz. Artists such as Robert Glasper, Thundercat, Kamasi Washington, Bilal, and many others formed the backbone of the album instrumentally, and thereby introduced a large audience to styles they may not necessarily have heard or sought out otherwise. Similarly, it was also widely argued whether or not You’re Dead, the latest album from electronic artist (and grand-nephew of Alice Coltrane) Flying Lotus, is, in fact, jazz. It sparked a debate about what “genres” entail and how styles can meld and compliment each other in new ways. And this is just the beginning – across the board, many artists who are pushing to bring jazz to a broader audience and expand its possibilities were given nods for their excellent work this year. Check out a few of our favorite key players below, and see the full list here.

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  • Kendrick Lamar – Album of the Year (To Pimp a Butterfly), Song of the Year (“Alright”), Best Rap Performance (“Alright”), Best Rap/Sung Performance (“These Walls” – featuring Bilal, Anna Wise & Thundercat), Best Rap Song (“Alright”), Best Rap Album (To Pimp a Butterfly), Best Rap Music Video (“Alright”)
  • D’Angelo and the Vanguard – Record of the Year (“Really Love” from Black Messiah), Best R&B Song (“Really Love” from Black Messiah), Best R&B Album (Black Messiah)
  • Flying Lotus – Best Dance Recording (“Never Catch Me” feat. Kendrick Lamar)
  • Snarky Puppy and Metropole Orkest – Best Contemporary Instrumental Album (Sylva)
  • Marcus Miller – Best Contemporary Instrumental Album (Afrodeezia)
  • Haitus Kaiyote – Best R&B Performance (“Breathing Underwater” from Choose Your Weapon)
  • Jazmin Sullivan – Best Traditional R&B Performance and Best R&B Song (“Let It Burn” from Reality Show), Best R&B Album (Reality Show)
  • Robert Glasper & The Robert Glasper Trio – Best Jazz Instrumental Album (Covered: Recorded Live At Capitol Studios
  • Terrence Blanchard – Best Jazz Instrumental Album (Breathless)
  • Cécile McLorin Salvant – Best Jazz Vocal Album (For One To Love)
  • Jamison Ross – Best Jazz Vocal Album (Jamison)
  • Joshua Redman – Best Improvised Jazz Solo (“Friend Or Foe, from The Bad Plus Joshua Redman)
  • Christian McBride – Best Improvised Jazz Solo (“Cherokee” from Live At The Village Vanguard)
  • Bob James & Nathan East – Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella (“Ghost Of A Chance” from The New Cool)
  • Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra – Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album (Cuba: The Conversation Continues), Best Instrumental Composition (“The Afro Latin Jazz Suite” feat. Rudresh Mahanthappa from Cuba: The Conversation Continues)
  • Liz Garbus, video director & producer, Amy Hobby, Jayson Jackson & Justin Wilkes, video producers – Best Music Film (What Happened, Miss Simone?)
  • Antonio Sanchez, composer – Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media (Birdman)

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