ALL POSTS TAGGED "dj-logic"

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For those of you who are still bumping Esperanza Spalding’s Radio Music Society album in your cars or on your iPods, prepare for great news! keep reading »

Arturo O’Farrill and his Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra will be performing their fifth annual new music concert which will feature a spoken word jam curated by poet, musician, and visionary Angel R. Rodriguez, Sr., as well as a slew of guest poets who will be accompanied by the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra. DJ Logic will be on hand to help mix the classic sound of boogaloo, mambo, and salsa with hip-hop, acid jazz, and alternative improvisation in this celebration of the Latino artist community.

Why did we choose Bitches Brew for the first “Issue?” When one of our brethrens at Revive was asked to sit on the panel at last year’s CMJ Music Marathon Week by the Miles Davis Estate to talk about the intersections between jazz and hip-hop and how it relates to Bitches Brew, we jumped out of our seats and said “yes, yes!” At last there was a camp, the Miles Davis Estate, that like ours, valued progressive jazz music beyond the confines of strict genre assignments. We respected what the estate was doing, connecting with young cats in different areas of popular culture, and outside of academic jazz circles, to revitalize the legacy of Miles Davis—and not just Miles Davis—but the eras of music that can be connected directly back to his influence.

We invite you to experience the panel on “The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Jazz” moderated by Raydar Ellis in a a 2 part series. A hand selected group of the panelists discuss the revival of jazz music through its marriage with hip-hop. Panelists talk about GURU’s legacy, how the use of new technologies has redefined the concept of jazz (formerly known as a genre stuck in a state of unchangeability) and what Miles Davis would play if he was still alive.

Jazz has employed new innovations in sound for centuries now, yet somewhere down the line the genre itself became encapsulated in a time vessel, rumored to be unchangeably preserved and pristine. Those who know jazz intimately know that Sun Ra’s first dabbling with Moog synthesizers, or the reverb or tape manipulation on Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew were examples of how jazz was pushed in directions that produced offspring that would later manifest in other shapes and forms. In the case of electronic music, today we may see them as divergent or different in the least, but in essence, no offspring is without DNA from their parent.

The Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University in Chicago, IL is currently hosting the Miles Davis Festival in celebration of the 85th Anniversary of Native-Illinois jazz icon Miles Davis’ birth. The four-month celebration (from January to April 2011) features 19 performances in venues large and small throughout a variety of Chicago’s neighborhoods.

We invite you to experience the SXSW panel on “The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Jazz” moderated by Raydar Ellis in a a 2 part series. A hand selected group of the panelists discuss the revival of jazz music through its marriage with hip-hop. Panelists talk about GURU’s legacy, how the use of new technologies has redefined the concept of jazz (formerly known as a genre stuck in a state of unchangeability) and what Miles Davis would play if he was still alive.

On Wednesday, March 16th, Meghan Stabile (Founder/President of Revive Music Group), will be presenting on a SXSW panel moderated by Brian “Raydar” Ellis (Revive’s resident creative mastermind) on “The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Jazz.” They will share the roundtable discussion with Vince and Erin, as well as DJ Logic, and Andre Torres (Founder/Publisher of Wax Poetics).

Improvisation is essential to jazz music. It’s a founding principle, in fact—to have a framework, a scaffolding, a skeleton—and then, within that structure, to make meaning from what already exists. When I started listening to, learning, and playing jazz, as a bassist and pianist, I assumed that some people could improvise and some couldn’t—that Louis Armstrong or someone was up in the sky with a magic jazz wand tapping some people’s heads with the gift while passing others by.

You have to have been living on a remote island without people to not know who Miles Davis is, but yet few have heard of Teo Macero. Teo is arguably the creative mastermind behind Bitches Brew, who had such a meticulous and distinct style to his craft that he changed entirely the landscape of music production, and employed a cutting and splicing technique that was the precursor to the huge take off of sampling later seen in hip-hop. The Revivalist interviewed some of our favorite DJ/Producers—Rob Swift, Raydar Ellis, Carlos Nino, and DJ Logic —to gain their insight about Teo’s imprint on American music and the advent of new technologies to the music studio that lead to the evolution or devolution (depending on who you ask) of sound.